Balsamic Dijon Glazed Roasted Brussels Sprouts

I always hated Brussels sprouts — that is, until I tasted this recipe, given to me by my very own plant-based physician, Dr. Roy Artal. The funny thing is that I never liked mustard either, but in this recipe, I absolutely love it! This recipe is a real game changer when it comes to getting people to eat their non-starchy vegetables. The taste will vary depending on which brands of mustard and vinegar you use, so be sure to use brands you love, and always buy the best you can afford. 

This marinade is delicious on other vegetables as well. So far, I have used it on broccoli, cauliflower, and white turnips, but the Brussels sprouts are by far my favorite. Make sure to cook as many trays as your oven will hold, because two pounds of vegetables yield only about four cups of finished product and, since these taste just like candy, you will have no problem eating them all by yourself! This marinade is also delicious on starchy vegetables like cubed sweet potatoes or butternut squash.

These tasty tidbits are not only heavenly right out of the oven but also at room temperature and even cold over a salad. Always remember to be mindful when roasting vegetables of varying water content together, as the ones with the higher water content will be done more quickly and could burn if you leave them in the oven until the denser vegetables are done. I recommend roasting vegetables of varying water content separately or at least on different trays. You can watch Dr. Artal preparing this recipe on Episode 7 of my television show Healthy Living with Chef AJ, which you can find on Foody TV and now on YouTube as well.

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds Brussels sprouts (or any vegetable, for that matter)
  • 4 Tablespoons of salt-free mustard (or your favorite low-sodium Dijon mustard)
  • 4 Tablespoons of your favorite balsamic vinegar

Brussels Sprouts

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 400°F.
  2. Trim the ends off Brussels sprouts and cut in halves or fourths (depending on how large they are). The important thing when roasting vegetables is that you make each piece roughly the same size. The smaller you cut them, the faster they will cook.
  3. Place the vegetables in a large bowl and add mustard and balsamic vinegar. Mix well until the veggies are completely coated. 
  4. Roast on a large baking tray covered with a non-stick silicone baking mat for at least 30 minutes, stirring every 10-15 minutes. If your Brussels sprouts are quite large or you prefer them crispier or more blackened, roast them up to 30 minutes longer or until they are cooked the way that you like them. 
  5. Make sure you stir the vegetables every 10-15 minutes.
  6. The more vegetables you have on the tray, the longer they will take to roast. If you are cooking more than one tray at a time, which I wholeheartedly recommend you do, rotate the trays every 15-30 minutes. 

Note

  • A thick and syrupy reduced balsamic vinegar that contains only 4% acidity instead of 6%, like Napa Valley Naturals Grand Reserve, is preferred. I use a salt-free stoneground mustard made by Westbrae.
  • You can cut down on the cooking time for roasted vegetables by cooking them in an air fryer.

More in this category:

« Roasted Parsnips
  • Ingredients:
    • 2 pounds Brussels sprouts (or any vegetable, for that matter)
    • 4 Tablespoons of salt-free mustard (or your favorite low-sodium Dijon mustard)
    • 4 Tablespoons of your favorite balsamic vinegar

    Brussels Sprouts

  • Directions:
    1. Preheat oven to 400°F.
    2. Trim the ends off Brussels sprouts and cut in halves or fourths (depending on how large they are). The important thing when roasting vegetables is that you make each piece roughly the same size. The smaller you cut them, the faster they will cook.
    3. Place the vegetables in a large bowl and add mustard and balsamic vinegar. Mix well until the veggies are completely coated. 
    4. Roast on a large baking tray covered with a non-stick silicone baking mat for at least 30 minutes, stirring every 10-15 minutes. If your Brussels sprouts are quite large or you prefer them crispier or more blackened, roast them up to 30 minutes longer or until they are cooked the way that you like them. 
    5. Make sure you stir the vegetables every 10-15 minutes.
    6. The more vegetables you have on the tray, the longer they will take to roast. If you are cooking more than one tray at a time, which I wholeheartedly recommend you do, rotate the trays every 15-30 minutes. 
  • Note:
    • A thick and syrupy reduced balsamic vinegar that contains only 4% acidity instead of 6%, like Napa Valley Naturals Grand Reserve, is preferred. I use a salt-free stoneground mustard made by Westbrae.
    • You can cut down on the cooking time for roasted vegetables by cooking them in an air fryer.
  • Credit:

    I always hated Brussels sprouts — that is, until I tasted this recipe, given to me by my very own plant-based physician, Dr. Roy Artal. The funny thing is that I never liked mustard either, but in this recipe, I absolutely love it! This recipe is a real game changer when it comes to getting people to eat their non-starchy vegetables. The taste will vary depending on which brands of mustard and vinegar you use, so be sure to use brands you love, and always buy the best you can afford. 

    This marinade is delicious on other vegetables as well. So far, I have used it on broccoli, cauliflower, and white turnips, but the Brussels sprouts are by far my favorite. Make sure to cook as many trays as your oven will hold, because two pounds of vegetables yield only about four cups of finished product and, since these taste just like candy, you will have no problem eating them all by yourself! This marinade is also delicious on starchy vegetables like cubed sweet potatoes or butternut squash.

    These tasty tidbits are not only heavenly right out of the oven but also at room temperature and even cold over a salad. Always remember to be mindful when roasting vegetables of varying water content together, as the ones with the higher water content will be done more quickly and could burn if you leave them in the oven until the denser vegetables are done. I recommend roasting vegetables of varying water content separately or at least on different trays. You can watch Dr. Artal preparing this recipe on Episode 7 of my television show Healthy Living with Chef AJ, which you can find on Foody TV and now on YouTube as well.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VegWorldMag VERTICAL

Grab a Free Digital
Subscription to VEGWORLD Magazine

Enter your first name & email for instant access

Invalid Input

Please enter your email address.

Invalid Input

We will never spam or use your email for solicitation. VEGWORLD will update you with our newsletter loaded with free recipes and motivation.