Hinona Kabu Miso Soup

A lovely, light, and vegetarian “dashi” broth is the base for this soothing and restorative Japanese soup, which cooks up in no time at all. It’s delightful at any time of the year but especially in the winter, when our immune system needs some extra TLC. 

This miso soup features gorgeous, magenta-kissed, slender hinona kabu turnips and their greens (if you can’t find them, substitute white or purple daikon or vibrant watermelon radish), together with aromatic ginger and garlic, carrot, shiitake mushrooms, and tofu for a delicate and very nourishing lunch or supper. Miso, a living probiotic food, confers delicious umami flavor to the dashi broth as well as fiber, protein, and vitamins K and B12, all of which help fortify immunity and gut health. 

  • Total Time: Overnight Soaking plus 45 minutes
  • Prep Time: Overnight soaking plus 15 minutes
  • Yield: 3-4 servings

Ingredients

Dashi

  • strip of dried kombu seaweed, approximately 3x5 in. square (available online or at your health food or Asian grocer’s)
  • 4-6 small dried organic shiitake mushrooms
  • 5 cups water

Soup

  • 1 clove garlic, sliced émincé (that is, very thinly sliced)
  • ½ inch ginger, peeled and cut into fine matchsticks
  • ½ cake of tofu (soft, silken, or firm), sliced into bite-sized cubes or slabs
  • ½ large Japanese or juicing carrot, peeled and sliced in half lengthwise, then in ¼ in. slices
  • 4-5 hinona kabu turnips, peeled or scrubbed to remove root hairs, sliced into ¼ in. slices on the bias, or ½ medium daikon sliced in half lengthwise and then into ¼ in. slices, or 1 medium watermelon radish, quartered and sliced in ¼ in. slices
  • 2 cups packed hinona kabu turnip greens, or any tender, leafy green, cut chiffonade into ½ inch ribbons
  • 1 bunch scallions, green and whites, cut on the bias into ½ inch slices
  • 3 Tablespoons mild white miso, or to taste

Optional garnish 

  • Scallion green tops, sliced thinly

Hinona Kabu Miso Soup

Directions

  1. In two separate non-metallic bowls, soak kombu and shiitakes separately, each in 2½ cups water. Place in the refrigerator for 8 hours.
  2. Discard kombu and reserve liquid. 
  3. Remove shiitakes and reserve liquid. 
  4. Separate shiitake caps from stems. Slice caps ¼ in. thick. Slice stems into matchsticks. Set mushrooms aside. 
  5. Combine both reserved liquids. (This is your dashi broth.) 
  6. Heat dashi to a gentle simmer. 
  7. Add shiitakes and cook for 10 minutes.
  8. Add scallions, garlic, ginger, turnips (or radish), and carrot, and simmer until vegetables are tender.
  9. Turn off heat, add greens, and gently transfer tofu. Allow to steep for 5 minutes for all flavors to blend.
  10. Add some of the miso to a ladle or small sieve: Dip ladle partially into pot to allow some broth to mix in and stir with chopsticks to dissolve the miso, releasing it into the pot as you add more broth. 
  11. If using a sieve, submerge it partially into the dashi, stirring with chopsticks to encourage the miso to pass through the mesh into the broth. 
  12. Repeat until you reach desired strength and flavor. Very gently use the chopsticks to disperse the miso evenly throughout the soup. 
  13. Garnish with scallion greens, if desired, and serve immediately. Savor the aroma and flavor!

TIPS

Dashi is best eaten fresh. It will last a few days refrigerated, but it’s best to make only the quantity you need every time you make a batch of soup.

Only add the miso to the pot if you plan to consume all the soup in one sitting. Reheating or boiling miso will kill its microbes and reduce its benefits. 

If you have more soup than you plan to use at once, refrigerate the rest. To serve, ladle the soup into bowls and then add miso to each individually, about a teaspoon of the miso per bowl, or to taste.

Note

About the Chef

Cathy

Cathy Katin-Grazzini, Food Editor and feature writer at VEGWORLD Magazine, is a plant-based chef, nutritional coach, cooking instructor, and owner of Cathy’s Kitchen Prescription LLC. Certified in Plant-Based Nutrition from the T. Colin Campbell Center for Nutrition Studies at Cornell, Cathy is also a graduate of Rouxbe Cooking School’s Professional Plant-Based Program. She has a BA from the University of Chicago, attended graduate school at Harvard University, and received a MA from Johns Hopkins University.

Cathy lives with her husband Giordano in Ridgefield, CT. When she’s not inventing and fermenting, she loves to run, hike, and adventure travel atop their trusty Ducati . Cathy’s original recipes, cooking videos, and nutritional blog can be found at http://www.cathyskitchenprescription.com and a gallery of her dishes at http://www.instagram.com/cathyskitchenprescription.

  • Total Time: Overnight Soaking plus 45 minutes
  • Prep Time: Overnight soaking plus 15 minutes
  • Yield: 3-4 servings
  • Ingredients:

    Dashi

    • strip of dried kombu seaweed, approximately 3x5 in. square (available online or at your health food or Asian grocer’s)
    • 4-6 small dried organic shiitake mushrooms
    • 5 cups water

    Soup

    • 1 clove garlic, sliced émincé (that is, very thinly sliced)
    • ½ inch ginger, peeled and cut into fine matchsticks
    • ½ cake of tofu (soft, silken, or firm), sliced into bite-sized cubes or slabs
    • ½ large Japanese or juicing carrot, peeled and sliced in half lengthwise, then in ¼ in. slices
    • 4-5 hinona kabu turnips, peeled or scrubbed to remove root hairs, sliced into ¼ in. slices on the bias, or ½ medium daikon sliced in half lengthwise and then into ¼ in. slices, or 1 medium watermelon radish, quartered and sliced in ¼ in. slices
    • 2 cups packed hinona kabu turnip greens, or any tender, leafy green, cut chiffonade into ½ inch ribbons
    • 1 bunch scallions, green and whites, cut on the bias into ½ inch slices
    • 3 Tablespoons mild white miso, or to taste

    Optional garnish 

    • Scallion green tops, sliced thinly

    Hinona Kabu Miso Soup

  • Directions:
    1. In two separate non-metallic bowls, soak kombu and shiitakes separately, each in 2½ cups water. Place in the refrigerator for 8 hours.
    2. Discard kombu and reserve liquid. 
    3. Remove shiitakes and reserve liquid. 
    4. Separate shiitake caps from stems. Slice caps ¼ in. thick. Slice stems into matchsticks. Set mushrooms aside. 
    5. Combine both reserved liquids. (This is your dashi broth.) 
    6. Heat dashi to a gentle simmer. 
    7. Add shiitakes and cook for 10 minutes.
    8. Add scallions, garlic, ginger, turnips (or radish), and carrot, and simmer until vegetables are tender.
    9. Turn off heat, add greens, and gently transfer tofu. Allow to steep for 5 minutes for all flavors to blend.
    10. Add some of the miso to a ladle or small sieve: Dip ladle partially into pot to allow some broth to mix in and stir with chopsticks to dissolve the miso, releasing it into the pot as you add more broth. 
    11. If using a sieve, submerge it partially into the dashi, stirring with chopsticks to encourage the miso to pass through the mesh into the broth. 
    12. Repeat until you reach desired strength and flavor. Very gently use the chopsticks to disperse the miso evenly throughout the soup. 
    13. Garnish with scallion greens, if desired, and serve immediately. Savor the aroma and flavor!

    TIPS

    Dashi is best eaten fresh. It will last a few days refrigerated, but it’s best to make only the quantity you need every time you make a batch of soup.

    Only add the miso to the pot if you plan to consume all the soup in one sitting. Reheating or boiling miso will kill its microbes and reduce its benefits. 

    If you have more soup than you plan to use at once, refrigerate the rest. To serve, ladle the soup into bowls and then add miso to each individually, about a teaspoon of the miso per bowl, or to taste.

  • Note:

    About the Chef

    Cathy

    Cathy Katin-Grazzini, Food Editor and feature writer at VEGWORLD Magazine, is a plant-based chef, nutritional coach, cooking instructor, and owner of Cathy’s Kitchen Prescription LLC. Certified in Plant-Based Nutrition from the T. Colin Campbell Center for Nutrition Studies at Cornell, Cathy is also a graduate of Rouxbe Cooking School’s Professional Plant-Based Program. She has a BA from the University of Chicago, attended graduate school at Harvard University, and received a MA from Johns Hopkins University.

    Cathy lives with her husband Giordano in Ridgefield, CT. When she’s not inventing and fermenting, she loves to run, hike, and adventure travel atop their trusty Ducati . Cathy’s original recipes, cooking videos, and nutritional blog can be found at http://www.cathyskitchenprescription.com and a gallery of her dishes at http://www.instagram.com/cathyskitchenprescription.

  • Credit:

    A lovely, light, and vegetarian “dashi” broth is the base for this soothing and restorative Japanese soup, which cooks up in no time at all. It’s delightful at any time of the year but especially in the winter, when our immune system needs some extra TLC. 

    This miso soup features gorgeous, magenta-kissed, slender hinona kabu turnips and their greens (if you can’t find them, substitute white or purple daikon or vibrant watermelon radish), together with aromatic ginger and garlic, carrot, shiitake mushrooms, and tofu for a delicate and very nourishing lunch or supper. Miso, a living probiotic food, confers delicious umami flavor to the dashi broth as well as fiber, protein, and vitamins K and B12, all of which help fortify immunity and gut health. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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